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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> in a few moments, defense secretary leon panetta speaks of the center for new american security. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 eastern. the average new facebook is in india or indonesia right now. they are using a mobile phone primarily. in a lot of cases, there is not an infrastructure that you have in the u.s. many americans will say facebook is good for gossip and seeing what my friends are getting for lunch but if he were to talk to somebody in the middle east, maybe, you would hear a different story which is that facebook was providing access to news to people that had unique access to information they were not able to get otherwise and you get a much more meaty store about what facebook means to them. >> more from this facebook engineer with an insider's view of the company thanksgiving day on cspan after 12:30 p.m. eastern. at 2:00, chief justice john roberts. later, space pioneers and nasa officials pay a much to the first man to walk among, nell armstrong just before 11:00. >> defense secretary
than we were. the growth in spending has not been in the non-defense discretionary. the cost of security programs in that same time period has gone up 60%. the cost of mandatory programs is up 30%. i want to call your attention to one aspect progressives need to remind people. of the $1.50 trillion already in spending cuts, $900 billion comes from spending. we have given far more than when it comes to defense side. let's talk about those for a minute. the budget control act and sequestration would result in dramatic cuts to spending. we have heard a lot of talk about the impact it will have on our national defense. to believe that having ended one war in iraq and ending another in afghanistan that we cannot find savings in the pentagon, i do not think that is a fair assessment. there are savings to be had that will not compromise our national security. the simpson-bowles commission approach established in the outer years to lay the temptation to go back into the non-defense accounts when too much political pressure keeps you out of defense spending. i would hope any long-term
gathering. [laughter] i know many of you and your friends and neighbors are recovering from the defense of hurricane sandy -- i want to let you know our thoughts are with everyone who has suffered during the storm and its aftermath. it has been a very challenging time for new york city. i think you have shown quite a bit of fortitude in coming back and getting back to business. my remarks today are going to focus on the reasons for the disappointingly slow pace of economic recovery in the united states, and the policy actions that have been taken by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated
tenure as director of the c.i.a. and secretary of defense, i have truly been privileged to meet and work with thousands of professionals who have made this fight their fight, who have put their lives on the line for their country and who have built the most effective global counterterrorism network the world has ever seen. their work, i believe, has made the american people safer. the united states more secure. and has put al qaeda on the defensive. let me describe some of the progress that has been achieved in this fight against al qaeda. first of all, with respect to core al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan, and that's where the leadership of al qaeda after 9/11 found refuge. our military forces, our intelligence professionals, our diplomats, our development experts have taken the fight to al qaeda's leadership. first through dramatically expanded counterterrorism operations on the afghanistan-pakistan border. and second, through a renewed, revitalized and properly resourced effort to help build an afghanistan that can secure and govern itself. and that's the fundamental mission in af
by the department of defense, it's now a not for profit called helmets to hard hats. and what it basically does, it identifies 60,000 american businesses and some of the trade unions. they collaborate to get together, to identify veterans who have already had extraordinary training and discipline and leadership and teamwork and it accelerates the apprenticeship program. so these individuals could be making $60,000, $70,000 a year if there was work to be had here. so it's an investment in america, it's an investment in american businesses, and it says to our returning veterans in a real sincere and genuine way, thank you for your service. mr. garamendi: you said earlier that the american society of engineers, i think that was the name, said that we have a d rating for infrastructure and that we need over $2 trillion. i don't know anybody in my district where we may have a serious flood in the next three days that says the infrastructure is adequate. they're look at those levinees and they're watching the water rise and they're saying, this isn't sufficient to protect us. so in a very real sense
to reach a cease- fire. the minister of defense and president of israel and prime minister. i met with the u.s. secretary of state, hillary clinton in jerusalem. i have just spoken to prime minister netanyahu for the second time today. my paramount concern throughout has been for the safety and well-being of all citizens, no matter where they are. innocent people, including children have been injured on both sides. families on both sides were forced to cower in fear as the violence raged around them. the circumstances were similar to those when i visited in 2009 and recent events have been eerily reminiscent. this morning, i heard from the team in gaza who reported on the impact of violence, including increased civilian casualties which reached more than 149 palestinians killed and more than 900 injured and the displacement of 10,000 gazans. ongoing programs for food are experiencing funding shortage and [indiscernible] i am asking our emergency and humanitarian teams to do whatever they can to alleviate the suffering. attacks on both sides continue today as the cease-fire approac
be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are going to be much greater. they are leaving an impression there is something unfair. this is the time you need correspondents who have spent years in the region, because by and large, you ask what i think of the coverage. i think it is surface. it focuses on the casualties. you do not know what the possibilities may be for agreement on the sides. i think that is one thing we have lost in not having correspondence to report from the region year after year. >> it is interesting that a couple nights ago, and abc world news tonight had a tour during another story while the gaza story erupted, and she had a big intro. they gave her about 45 seconds to do the story, and you could see she could not get it out. it was difficult, so that is yet another dimension of trying to make everything right size, even and alan -- an analysis from a reporter who really does understand that story. it would have been wonder
to the veterans administration, go to the department of defense, and you'll find dozens of web sites that tell you how to get in touch with veterans, how to run a job fair, or how to look for a particular skill sets in an individual you need for your organization. sometimes you are going to have to do more than just check the skill set out and hire somebody. what's he did when he was 17 or 1819 dust out of high school, they may pick up a lot of things in the army that they did not come in with a particular skill, so we might have to have a program that builds on that early education and gives them the training they need for the job you have for dumping. not just expect them to walk through the door with everything that you need. you may have to provide training, mentoring, and other kinds of support group activities for these and people. >> how do we use this experience that we are all now much more aware of to establish a template? if we ever go to war again, and this type of issue probably would be even more critical, given the changing nature of the economy and the global economy, do we require
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)